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Posts for: March, 2021

By Ob/Gyn of Houston
March 19, 2021
Tags: Yeast Infection  
Yeast InfectionYeast infections are one of life’s unpleasant issues. Most women will experience at least one yeast infection during their lifetime. The discharge, itching, burning, and vaginal rash can leave any gal feeling more than a little uncomfortable. However, because a yeast infection shares symptoms with some STIs it’s always a good idea to make a trip to see your OBGYN if you are sexually active. Here’s what to know about treating yeast infections and when to turn to a doctor.
 
Why do yeast infections happen?

An overgrowth of Candida, a type of fungus, leads to a yeast infection. While there may be fungus present in the vagina at any point in time, often it’s not enough to cause symptoms; however, when there’s overgrowth this leads to an infection.
 
Certain factors can increase your risk for yeast infections,
  • Pregnancy
  • Taking antibiotics
  • Diabetes
  • A compromised immune system
  • Stress
  • Hormonal imbalance
  • Poor diet
What are the signs?

The most common signs of a yeast infection include,
  • A thick, white vaginal discharge
  • Burning and swelling of the vagina
  • Itching
  • Soreness
  • Pain with urination or sex
How do I treat a yeast infection?

While certainly uncomfortable, a yeast infection is easy to treat. In fact, many women find relief from going to their local pharmacy and picking up yeast infection medication (you can purchase these products over the counter). If you don’t experience relief from your symptoms about a week after treatment, then it’s time to call your OBGYN.
 
If you’ve had a yeast infection before and you recognize the symptoms then over-the-counter treatments should be fine; however, if this is your first time dealing with a yeast infection you should turn to your doctor to find out if that’s exactly what it is. If you’re dealing with severe symptoms or if you are dealing with recurring infections (infections that happen at least four times a year) you should turn to your OBGYN.
 
Your OBGYN can do everything from prescribing yeast infection medication to providing STI screenings and HPV vaccines. If you’re experiencing symptoms of a yeast infection, turn to your OBGYN today for the treatment you need.

By Ob/Gyn of Houston
March 09, 2021
Tags: Miscarriage  
MiscarriageWe understand the turmoil and grief that comes from a miscarriage. It’s important to know that you are not alone. Miscarriages are incredibly common. In fact, about 15-25 percent of pregnancies end in miscarriage. Recovering from a miscarriage both physically and mentally takes time, and your OBGYN can provide you with the tools, advice, and support you need to recover from this sudden loss.

Bleeding after Miscarriage

Whether you had to go through a D&C or you had a natural miscarriage, it is completely normal to bleed immediately after. The bleeding will be heavy for several hours, and it’s normal for it to contain tissue and clots. The bleeding will lighten and go away after 1-2 weeks. Only wear pads, not tampons, while bleeding.

Getting Your Period

It is normal for the first period after a miscarriage to be a little different than what you’re normally used to. Your period could be unusually heavy, or you may only experience spotting. It can take one cycle before your period returns to normal and it should be normal by the second cycle after your miscarriage. If you are still dealing with irregularities after your second cycle, you should talk with your OBGYN.

Having Sex

Most OBGYNs will give you the go-ahead to have sex again after about two weeks, but your OBGYN will need to have you come in for a follow-up to make sure that you’re not still bleeding. If you are, your doctor may ask you to wait a little longer.

Addressing Your Emotions

Your OBGYN has worked with many women who have experienced miscarriages, and they understand that what you are going through is traumatic and stressful. Some ways to support your emotional health during this time include,
  • Spend more time with friends and family
  • Ask for help and support when you need it
  • Talk to other women who have also experienced miscarriages (there are support groups that can help)
  • Talk to your OBGYN if you are experiencing symptoms of anxiety or depression (they can provide counseling referrals)
  • Get adequate nutrition and maintain a healthy, nourishing diet
  • Get regular exercise
  • Turn to meditation or other outlets for stress relief
  • Make sure you are getting good sleep every night
Many women who have experienced a miscarriage worry that they may experience another one, but it’s important to note that women who have had a miscarriage in the past are not at a higher risk for future miscarriages. Many women go on to have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies after a miscarriage.

Remember that you do not have to go through the recovery process alone. Many women seek solace in their OBGYN after a miscarriage. When you are ready, they can also guide you through the steps of getting pregnant again and providing you with the support system and compassionate care you need.