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Posts for category: Women's Health Care

By Ob/Gyn of Houston
June 01, 2020
Tags: USDA’s MyPlate  
Congratulations on your little bundle of joy! Pregnancy is a new and exciting time. Your body goes through vast changes as your baby develops. It’s important to do everything possible to guarantee a healthy baby. This includes changing your diet! Many women aren’t sure what they should and shouldn’t eat during this time. Why not schedule an appointment with your local OBGYN and learn what’s best for you?
 
A Balanced Diet and You
You should start eating a balanced diet right away when you find out you are expecting. Most OBGYN’s even recommend starting before you’re even pregnant. What you eat directly affects the baby’s nutrition. Eating healthy foods keeps both of your bodies strong. It’s also a good idea to take a prenatal vitamin or multivitamin with folic acid every day. 
 
Follow your OBGYN’s advice on the proper balance of dairy, proteins, vegetables, fruit, grains, and fats during your pregnancy. A great resource is the USDA’s “MyPlate.” This is the upgraded version of the food pyramid. 
 
Healthy Weight Gain
Everyone is different when it comes to pregnancy. Your OBGYN will monitor your weight gain to make sure it’s within healthy levels. Typically, women gain 2-4 pounds during the first trimester and 3-4 each month during the second and third trimester. 
 
Although you are eating for two, your calorie intake should only increase by about 300 or so. This amount varies between women, so talk to your doctor about an appropriate goal. It’s even more important in the first trimester because of morning sickness. Nausea can make it hard to keep food and fluids down. 
 
Dangerous Foods During Pregnancy
You should avoid certain types of food throughout your pregnancy. These are dangerous for you and the baby. Avoid eating or drinking: 
  • Smoked seafood
  • Hot dogs or deli meat
  • Meat spreads
  • Uncooked sprouts
  • Unpasteurized milk or juice
  • Fish that contain high levels of mercury
It’s also a good idea to reduce your intake of fat and cholesterol. You should also make sure you’re not drinking alcohol, smoking, or consuming high levels of caffeine. 
 
Pregnancy Cravings
Many women crave specific foods during their pregnancies. Just try to make sure what you’re eating ends up being healthy and providing nutrients to your body. If you end up craving junk food, try to limit how much you eat. 
By Ob/Gyn of Houston
May 01, 2020
Urinary IncontinenceUrinary incontinence happens when an individual can’t fully control their bladder, resulting in them experiencing leakage. Most women have experienced weakened bladder control at some point in their life. It’s especially common during pregnancy and for a while after. But when do a few accidents indicate a problem? An Obstetrician-Gynecologist (OBGYN) can help with all matters related to women’s sexual and reproductive health. Schedule an appointment with your OBGYN if urinary incontinence starts happening frequently or affects your quality of life. 
 
Before Your Appointment
 
First, don’t be embarrassed about discussing this with your OBGYN. They are a medical professional designed to help you. There are also a few ways to be prepared for your appointment. Try to keep track or write down every instance of urinary incontinence. Record the amount, time of day, frequency, and what you were doing at the time. 
 
Types of Incontinence
 
There are two main types of incontinence that a patient can experience: stress and urge. Stress incontinence happens when pressure is placed on the bladder, forcing leakage. This can happen from any sort of muscular contraction, like sneezing or laughing. Urge incontinence is an overactive bladder. A patient may constantly feel like they need to go to the bathroom. This makes it hard to determine when they do need to go or not, causing accidents to happen.
 
Other causes of urinary continence are also a possibility. Certain foods, drinks, and medications can temporarily affect bladder control. These are known as diuretics, and affect how much urine your body produces. 
 
Common diuretics:
  • Caffeine
  • Carbonated drinks
  • Alcohol
  • Artificial Sweeteners
  • Spicy, sugary, or acidic foods
  • Chili peppers
  • Chocolate
  • Blood pressure and heart medications
  • Muscle relaxants and sedatives
You should also talk to your OBGYN about the possibility of overflow or functional incontinence. Overflow is caused by blockage of the urethra or poor bladder contraction. Functional incontinence is the result of other medical conditions that make going to the bathroom difficult. 
 
Treating Urinary Incontinence
 
Talk to your OBGYN about a treatment that is right for you. There are many possibilities and combinations to try. Many women find success through retraining their bladders, using certain medications, or possibly surgical intervention. 
By Ob/Gyn of Houston
April 15, 2020
Tags: Obstetrician  

Know when to schedule your first appointment with an OBGYN.

Whether you think you might be pregnant or you already received a positive at-home test result, not only do you want to confirm that you have a new bundle of joy on the way but also that you and the baby are getting the proper care from the very beginning.Doctor Appointment

When should I schedule my first prenatal visit?

As soon as you find out that you are pregnant it is important that you schedule an appointment with an OBGYN. In most cases, your first prenatal appointment will happen at around 8 weeks. If you have certain health conditions or are experiencing any symptoms such as vaginal bleeding or abdominal discomfort then you may come in sooner. Even if this isn’t your first pregnancy you should still come in for regular prenatal appointments.

The first prenatal appointment is one of the most important visits and so it can often take longer. This is a time for us to sit down with you and get to know you better. Think of the first appointment as establishing rapport with our OBGYN team. After all, we will be with you throughout your pregnancy so we want you to be comfortable and happy with the care you are receiving.

What will happen during my first appointment?

We will need to go through your detailed medical history, which can include everything from any gynecological issues you might have to drug allergies, chronic health problems, or medications you are currently taking. We will also need to discuss any habits that could affect your pregnancy such as smoking or drinking.

We will also talk to you about the different genetic tests available to you throughout the course of your pregnancy. These tests can be a great way to screen for certain birth defects or genetic disorders like Down syndrome. We will discuss in detail the screenings tests that you can choose to have.

A physical and pelvic exam will also be performed during your first visit. We will also need to take a sample of blood to test for any undiagnosed health conditions or STDS. A urinary sample will also be taken to check for urinary tract infections (UTIs) or other issues.

Of course, during this appointment and any subsequent visits you have, we want you to know that if you have any questions or concerns that you shouldn’t hesitate to ask us. We can provide you with tips, advice, and support throughout this exciting and whirlwind time in your life to make sure that your pregnancy goes as smoothly as possible.

Your obstetrician is here to provide you with the care, treatment and education you need to help navigate your pregnancy. We provide comprehensive maternal fetal medicine to ensure that you and your baby get the care you both deserve during this exciting time.

By Ob/Gyn of Houston
March 13, 2020
Tags: Pregnancy   Exercise   Pregnant  

If this is your first pregnancy you may certainly feel like you’re in uncharted territory. There are so many unknowns as you reach 40 weeks and your OBGYN is going to be a crucial part of guiding you throughout this journey into motherhood. An OBGYN will provide you with care, treatment, checkups, and support along the way. One question you may be asking yourself is: Can I exercise while pregnant?

The simple answer is that yes, exercise is part of maintaining a healthy pregnancy. It can help boost your energy and mood, especially during the earlier months when you may be feeling a bit tired and sluggish. Working out can even alleviate aches and pains throughout your pregnancy. In fact, regular physical activity could even be key to preventing gestational diabetes.

If you were working out prior to becoming pregnant then there is no reason why you shouldn’t be able to continue working out; however, some things will need to change. While you may wish to workout at the same intensity and level you had been, your body is going through a lot of changes. Low-impact aerobic exercise such as walking or even swimming may be recommended by an OBGYN over high-intensity training.

What if you were a dedicated Crossfitter, HIIT queen, or marathon-running champ before getting pregnant? If you are a serious athlete, it’s even more important that your obstetrician works with you to create a training and workout program that will help you maintain what you’ve worked hard for while also being safe for both you and baby. This is particularly important for women who are personal trainers or professional athletes.

Starting Exercise While Pregnant

If you haven’t been working out prior to becoming pregnant you may want to take up a more regular exercise regimen to maintain good health throughout your pregnant. Before starting a new workout routine it’s important to consult your OBGYN. It’s important that you start out with slow, easy activities like a brisk walk through the neighborhood. You wouldn’t go from not being active to suddenly tackling a Warrior Run, so you certainly don’t want to do it when you’re pregnant, either. Err on the conservative side when choosing workouts to do while pregnant, especially if you are new to regular exercise. Your OBGYN can provide you with a list of pregnancy-approved exercises.

How Much Exercise is Enough?

Most pregnant women will reap the benefits of exercise if they participate in moderate exercise for at least 30 minutes a day most days of the week, as recommended by the American Academy of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Of course, if you have any health problems such as heart disease or asthma, it’s extremely important that you talk with your OBGYN before you start any workout routine.

Workouts to avoid include any contact sports, exercises that could lead to falls or abdominal injuries, as well as exercising in extreme weather conditions. If you have questions about exercise during pregnant, talk with your OBGYN today.