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By Ob/Gyn of Houston
February 22, 2021
Tags: Ovarian Cysts  
What Are Ovarian CystsIf you are a woman, then chances are fairly good that you’ve had an ovarian cyst before. Maybe even several already; however, it’s also just as likely that you didn’t even know it. It’s common for cysts, or fluid-filled sacs, to develop in or on the ovaries. This is a very common condition for women during their reproductive years, and it’s typically not anything to worry about. From the office of your OBGYN, here’s what you should know about ovarian cysts.
 
What are the signs and symptoms of an ovarian cyst?

Many ovarian cysts are too small to cause symptoms; however, if the cyst is large you may notice:
  • Bloating or abdominal swelling
  • Abdominal pain or pressure, typically on the side where the cyst is
  • The pain may be dull and may come and go
Ruptured cysts can cause more severe pain. While ovarian cysts may cause pain with intercourse, abnormal vaginal bleeding, or pelvic pain, these symptoms are less common. If you are dealing with abdominal pain or swelling that has you concerned, schedule an appointment with your OBGYN.
 
What causes ovarian cysts?

Several factors can predispose certain women to ovarian cysts. These factors include:
  • Pregnancy
  • Hormonal issues
  • Pelvic infections
  • Endometriosis
When should I see my OBGYN?

It’s always a good idea to see your OBGYN as soon as possible if you are experiencing intense or severe abdominal pain, especially if it’s accompanied by a fever. Severe abdominal pain requires immediate medical attention.
 
How are ovarian cysts treated?

An ovarian cyst will typically go away on its own without treatment; however, the size of the cyst and the symptoms you are experiencing may determine whether or not you should have surgery to remove the cyst. Your doctor will continue to monitor the cyst through regular ultrasounds every few weeks or months to see if the cyst has gone away. Recurring or very large cysts often require surgery.
 
If you are dealing with abdominal pain or swelling that isn’t going away or is getting worse, it’s always a safe bet to call your OBGYN right away to schedule an immediate appointment.
The Benefits of Pelvic Floor Physical TherapyThe pelvic floor consists of muscles and connective tissue that provide support to the organs of the pelvis. The pelvic floor is important for everything from bladder and bowel control to sexual arousal. Unfortunately, many women will deal with pelvic floor dysfunction or pain at some point during their lifetime. If you are dealing with this problem, you may want to talk with your OBGYN about the benefits of pelvic floor physical therapy.

What causes pelvic floor dysfunction?

Some many injuries and conditions can weaken the muscles of the pelvis or even tear the tissue. Common causes of pelvic floor dysfunction include,
  • Nerve damage
  • Pregnancy and childbirth (the most common causes)
  • Traumatic injury to the pelvic (e.g., bad fall; car accident)
  • Obesity
  • Pelvic surgery
  • Genetics
What are the symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction?

If you are dealing with pelvic floor dysfunction you may experience these common symptoms,
  • Painful urination
  • An increased urge to urinate
  • Urinary or stool leakage
  • Constipation
  • Pain in the pelvic floor including the rectum and genitals
  • Pain with intercourse
  • Lower back pain
  • Muscle spasms in the pelvis
  • Pelvic pressure
What is pelvic floor therapy?

Just as someone might get physical therapy to restore function and strength into a shoulder injury or bad knee, your OBGYN may recommend that women who have pelvic floor dysfunction undergo pelvic floor physical therapy. These one-on-one physical therapy sessions are designed to help alleviate the symptoms of dysfunction while also training and re-strengthening weakened pelvic floor muscles.

Your OBGYN will first need to perform a physical exam to assess the muscle. This assessment will help us create a customized plan of action to alleviate your symptoms. Pelvic floor physical therapy may include,
  • Stretching and strengthening exercises
  • Coordination exercises
  • Relaxation techniques
  • Biofeedback
  • Heat or ice therapy
  • Electrical stimulation
Pelvic floor physical therapy has helped many women gain better control over their sexual health and bladder function. Whether you’re dealing with pelvic floor problems after giving birth or as a result of certain health problems such as endometriosis, your OBGYN may recommend pelvic floor physical therapy. Call your doctor to learn more.
By Ob/Gyn of Houston
January 28, 2021
Bleeding During Your PregnancyA Google search will show you thousands upon thousands of women who are wondering whether bleeding is okay during pregnancy. We understand that bleeding can be scary, especially if you aren’t sure what’s causing it. Here’s what you should know about bleeding, including when to turn to an OBGYN.

Bleeding During Your First Trimester

Your body is going through a ton of changes, especially during the first trimester. So it shouldn’t come as much of a surprise that as many as 30 percent of women experience some sort of spotting or light bleeding during early pregnancy. Some of the causes of light bleeding or spotting include,

Implantation bleeding: After about 6 to 12 days after conception, some women experience cramping and light spotting. This is known as implantation bleeding. While some women may assume that their period is coming (since implantation bleeding usually appears a few days before a woman’s period), implantation bleeding is very light and may cause pink or brown spotting that may only last a day or two.
Cervical polyps: These (often) benign polyps are common in women and can lead to inflammation and spots of bright red blood. You may not experience any other symptoms apart from light bleeding, but your OBGYN can diagnose polyps during a pelvic exam.
Pelvic exams, intercourse, or infection: Anything that may irritate the cervix may result in bleeding. This includes infections, intercourse, or a pelvic exam. If you notice some drops of bright red blood after intercourse or a pelvic exam, don’t worry. It will go away on its own.

Bleeding During Second and Third Trimester

While light bleeding is fairly normal during the first trimester, it’s less common and more likely to be a concern if there is bleeding in the second or third trimester. If you are bleeding during your second or third trimester it’s best to talk with your OBGYN as it could be a sign of,
  • Placental abruption
  • Problems with the cervix such as an infection
  • Placenta previa
  • Premature labor
Bleeding: When to be Concerned

Since bleeding could be a sign of a miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, or other serious problems, you must talk with your OBGYN about any bleeding you experience. You should call your doctor right away if,
  • Your bleeding lasts more than 24 hours
  • Bleeding is heavy or you pass blood clots or tissue
  • Your bleeding is accompanied by abdominal pain, fevers, or chills
If you have any concerns about symptoms or issues during pregnancy, your OBGYN can provide you with the answers and care you need. Don’t ever hesitate to call your OBGYN if you are worried about bleeding or other problems. A simple phone call can determine whether you need to come in for an evaluation.
By Ob/Gyn of Houston
January 13, 2021
Tags: Bladder Infection  
Bladder InfectionHaving trouble going? It could be due to a bladder infection.

You’ve been running back and forth to the bathroom all day and you’ve noticed an increased urgency to pee, even after you’ve just gone. What gives? Well, if you notice burning or pain with urination you could very well be dealing with a bladder infection. Most people will experience a bladder infection at least once during their lifetime. If you are experiencing symptoms of a bladder infection you may want to call your OBGYN for a checkup.

What are the signs of a bladder infection?

Bladder infections are one of the most common urinary tract infections (UTIs). If you have a bladder infection you may experience,
  • Strong-smelling urine
  • Cloudy urine
  • Increased urgency and frequency of urination
  • Abdominal cramping
  • Burning with urination
  • Pain that lingers after urinating
If you are experiencing symptoms of a bladder infection you must see your OBGYN right away for treatment. Bladder infections will require prescription medication to treat the infection. If left untreated, bacteria from the bladder can spread to the kidneys, leading to intense back pain, chills, fever, and vomiting.

How is a bladder infection treated?

Your OBGYN will prescribe an oral antibiotic to kill the bacteria in the bladder. You may also receive medication to ease burning and pain with urination. You must be drinking plenty of fluids to flush out bacteria in the bladder.

You should see an improvement in your symptoms after 2 days of taking the antibiotics, but you mustn’t stop taking your medication once you start to feel better, as the infection can return.

Is there a way to prevent bladder infections?

There are certain lifestyle adjustments that you can make to prevent the development of a bladder infection. Some of these habits include,
  • Drinking enough water every day
  • Taking showers over a bath
  • Not douching or using scented feminine products
  • Wearing loose-fitting clothes
  • Urinating immediately before and after intercourse
From bladder infections to birth control options, your OBGYN can be an invaluable source to turn to for treatment and care. If you are dealing with recurring bladder infections, you’ll definitely want to talk with your OBGYN to find out what could be causing your frequent infections.
By Ob/Gyn of Houston
December 24, 2020
What Is Cervical EctropionCervical ectropion, also referred to as cervical erosion, is when the glandular cells found inside the cervical canal are also found outside the cervix. This harmless, benign condition is more common than you might realize. Some women are born with this while others develop it as a result of hormonal changes. Young women who are taking oral contraceptives, pregnant, or going through adolescence are also more likely to develop cervical ectropion. If you have cervical ectropion, an OBGYN can provide you with the answers you need to manage this condition.
 
Are there symptoms?

Most of the time, this condition doesn’t cause any symptoms. Most women don’t even know they have it until they visit their gynecologist for their annual checkup. If you do have cervical ectropion you may notice,
  • Spotting between periods
  • Light discharge
  • Discomfort during sex
You may also experience a little discomfort when undergoing a regular pelvic exam. We understand that pain with sex can be concerning. Spotting or breakthrough bleeding between periods or pain with intercourse could also be signs of an infection, fibroids, endometriosis, or other health problems, so it’s important to see your OBGYN for a proper diagnosis.
 
How is cervical ectropion treated?

If you aren’t experiencing symptoms, then treatment really isn’t necessary. In some cases, cervical ectropion may just go away on its own. Of course, heavy discharge, bleeding, or pain can be managed through cauterization (performed through heat, cold or silver nitrate), which removes the glandular cells from outside the cervix.
 
In most cases, this procedure is enough to get rid of this condition; however, it is possible for symptoms to return. If they do, your OBGYN may decide to simply repeat the procedure.
 
Does cervical ectropion increase my risk for cervical cancer?

Finding out that there are cellular changes within the cervix can be a little unnerving, but this condition is completely harmless. If you are pregnant this will not harm your unborn child and this cervical ectropion will not increase your risk for cervical cancer.
 
Do you have questions or concerns about cervical ectropion? Want to talk about your treatment options? If so, your OBGYN can help.




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